Tag Archives: education

End of the year professional day

My school year is done, but here I sit in a meeting for our last professional development day of the year. Already we have people speak to us on The Common Core. And currently we are listening to a presenter speak about Digital Footprints. After lunch we have our break out sessions with our small groups and then we are free to go. Now both presentations have been going well but let’s face it this is a time for the teachers to catch up, talk about plans for the summer.

However I have discovered one thing I have been able to talk with the teachers who want to incorporate more of the technology based applications I use in the library (and have talked about here) in their classroom. I have already spoke with several teachers wanting to create a video for a concept in their lessons and post to my YouTube channel for the students to access. I also have been able to talk with a teacher about different authors and topics that’s will work for their LA lessons on social issues.

So while I sit here listening and learning about digital footprints (a topic I will be talking about next week here) I wanted to let you know that my school year is done but my collaboration with my fellow teachers is not.

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Filed under education

Get Your eBook On

So I talk about books a lot, since well, I am a librarian and all. And I have mentioned some apps and websites to visit if you are interested in writing a book of your own.  Well here are few more, and these are super easy that not only are they great for classroom use, but those budding writers in your class or home might get a kick out of these too. These apps are perfect for both entertainment and education (well at least the eBook ones are, the comic ones are purely entertainment).  Teachers will be able to create original eBooks to use in their classroom.  Teachers will have the ability to add images, text, links, recordings and more to the eBook. Then simply share with students or colleagues to allow greater access to information.  These apps allow you to create and upload your eBook to iBooks and ePub readers.  You can access many of them through an app or online.  The prices vary but these are all well worth the look.

Students and kids will have fun with these apps as well (especially the comic ones).  They can take stories they have written and create a collection, or create a photo book highlighting a recent summer event or family function that you can share with just those who you would like. No need to put in bookstores for the world to access, unless of course you want to.  These apps are a great way to keep kids creative and writing all summer long. Heck all year long for that matter.

The comic apps are fun since you don’t need to be an artist to use.  By using pictures you already have you can add cartoon images and drawings to create funny one of a kind strips.   So check them out.

eBooks

 

book writer

 

Book Writer for iOS

 

 

IDEAL

 

IDEAL e-Pub Creator for Android and iOS

 

 

creativebookbuilder

 

Creative Book Builder for Android and iOS

 

 

Digital Comics

Comic Puppets

 

Comic Puppets for Android and iOS

 

 

Photo comics Pro

 

Photo Comics Pro for Android

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Filed under apps, Books, Cartoons, Creativity, Digital Story Telling, ebooks, education, Reading, Technology, Writing

Increase Reading Capabilities

So I have been asked by many teachers, how can we help increase the reading capabilities of our students. This is a tough one since no two readers are the same.  I have tried several promotions in the library, but more often than not only die hard readers are acting on them.  It is difficult to get those who are struggling on a daily basis to not only read what is required of them, but to read another book for enjoyment.

I started to search through magazines and professional resources to see what the experts and other teachers are doing. And after reading through The Mailbox April/May 2014 issue I found two great ideas that I feel I should share.

Both ideas come from Njeri Jones Legrand, of Sharon Elementary in Charlotte NC.
TISC (This is So Cool): reading with accuracy to support comprehension
Getting students to interact with their reading material by using text-message shorthand as reading codes.  Begin by brainstorming with students abbreviations that match specific reading strategies you teach. Then create a mini poster showing each abbreviation, review and discuss the meaning.  Next, provide sticky note flag. Have each student track his/her thinking as they read by flagging specific points and coding the flag with the matching text abbreviation. When the student finishes reading, have them use the sticky notes to respond to the selection, summarize it, answer questions about it, or discuss it.
Here are the Abbreviations this teacher used:
QQ (Quick Question): Use this if the text is confusing or makes you think of a question
RUS (Are your serious?): Use this to flag information that makes you think WOW!
WOTD (Word of the Day): Use this to flag important words in the text
IDK (I don’t know): Use this to flag text that is really confusing and if you can’t figure out what’s going on.
411(Information): Use this to flag text that is important information
TSIA (This says it all): Use this to flag text that is the main idea

Ready, Set, Read!
Energize students to build their reading stamina with a daily challenge. Begin by assembling a read-o-meter (example shown at the bottom of this entry).  Next, display the meter and challenge every reader in class to read, focusing only one his/her reading material, for a set amount of time. As soon as students begin to lose focus, end the session and move the read-0-meter’s arrow to show students how long they read independently.  Begin each reading session by displaying the meter and challenging your readers to read productively longer than they did the previous day.

 

 

read-o-meter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

thank you to The Mailbox magazine and especially Njeri Jones Legrand for your amazing contributions to the reading community.

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Filed under Books, Creativity, education, Language Arts, Nonfiction reading, Reading

Some interesting ways to incorporate technology

Sometimes the technology can get the better than us.  Whether it be an updated system, or the latest installment of an app, or maybe there is a new program that is better than the one you just started using.  It is OK.  You are not alone. So many teachers, parents, and even students experience the same feeling.  It is just too hard to keep up, especially when the school systems are requiring that we (as teachers) use more and more technology in the classroom.  Well here are a few easy tricks to get the technology in there, without having a learn a whole new way to teaching.

1) PowerPoint game/quiz review shows.   Face it, reviewing a lesson before a test can be boring, here is a chance to make it fun.  Teachers have been creating reviews lessons using PowerPoint to mimic popular game shows like Jeopardy, Who Want to Be a Millionaire and Are you Smarter than a Fifth Grader? There are free templates online for you to download and make it your own.  This is a great way for those who are not too tech-savy to use an already established program.  I have done this many times, and have even used Prezi to create a few review games.

2) Just Tweet It! Students mission, to summarize a lesson in 160 characters or less.  Not only does this avoid having students repeat themselves over and over and over again, but it forces them to get at the real core of the lesson and what is being taught. This is good for end of the unit/lesson discussions, but also for a quick book review.  You have came them break up the main points of the standard book review to individual tweets (ex. main character, plot, etc)

3) Blogging from a characters perspective.  This is a fun one.  If you have ever had students write letters from the viewpoint of a character you have multiple options now to incorporate technology.  The most popular choice being Blogging.  Instead of letters, the students will post, and can add images and videos as well to enhance the post.  There are blog sites that can be used specficially for the classroom that protects the students from unwanted attention.

4) Surf the Web. This is an oldie but a goodie.  Webquests have been around for a while, and ultimately what it does is guides students to search the internet for specific information.  An idea is have students become curators for their own museum on a particular topic.  But since it is for a museum the students must determine what artifacts belong in their museum.  This hits many common core areas of study but also touches on technology and digital literacy since they must evaluate the sites for validity.

Again these are just a few options for you to ponder while you try to find ways to get that technology in the classroom.

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Filed under education, Language Arts, Math, Presentation, Science, Technology, Twitter

Google in Education

Happy New Year!  I took a little bit of break to collect some ideas and start on some posts and I am ready to start sharing again.  The first post for the new year is going to focus on using Google in the classroom and in education in general.  My school has recently provided all students with a Google account and access a Google drive to help streamline the process of homework, papers, and other classroom assignments.  However, There are several other options that Google has available that will provide the teacher and the student the opportunity for a more enriching learning experience.

1) Google Alerts
This feature provides a flexibility to receiving updates for a particular topic of interest.  The alert will be send directly to the student’s mailbox so the information is completely up-to-date. This is perfect for those using current events or news stories in their classroom activity and is helpful for reports dealing with ever changing events.

2) Google Books
Ahhhh, I couldn’t go one highlight without mentioning Google Books.  Forgive me I am a librarian so yes books will be at the top of my list.  And yes, I know they are in digital form but I am not totally against the digital book.  Do I think they should have an actual book of course but the digital book works just as well…but that is another topic.  Back to Google Books.  This tool is amazing for students to access millions of books and preview them for free.  It allows students to reference countless books on any subject matter to gain a greater level of understanding on said topic.

3) Google Talks and Hangouts
I love this option for video chatting with a group of people.  The feature allows for up to 10 individuals to conference in on the same video call at the same time in order to talk about ideas, discuss a book,  voice concerns for a project, etc.  I have used this feature actually with my two book clubs.  Each school was reading the same book and we were able to have a larger book discussion through the hangout option.

4) Google Scholar
Probably used more by high school and college level individuals, this feature provides the Google user the ability to research scholarly literature from multiple sources.  The latest articles, abstracts, and books can be downloaded directly into the users mailbox, and all information can be cited, and public profiles can be created.   This is wonderful for those students working on larger more detailed research papers and theses.

5) Google Calendar
The online agenda.  This is option allows the student to schedule when projects and assignments are due and even share their calendar with other users.  Also alerts can be sent through a text message or email in order to help the student submit assignments on time.

Overall Google helping the students interact with each other and educational information in a new way.  They are providing the tools for the student Google user to become a more active participant in their learning process and succeed in new ways.

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Filed under apps, education, Social Networking, Technology

Flipping Out in the Classroom

Everyone is flipping out, but in a good way.  The Flipped Classroom has become the latest craze in education and I for one am a huge fan.  Now educators and focus more on practicing the materials taught and more guided research instead of spending entire class periods lecturing.  Students love it too!  Homework is no longer just read from the book, answer the questions or fill in the worksheet; now they watch a video answer questions or be prepared to discuss the next class period.

Science and Math classes are especially enjoying this model because it allows the teacher to show how to solve a problem or run an experiment and the student can view it as many times as needed until they understand the concept.  Language Arts teachers love this too, because they can show how a book  influences the movie version or show an interview with the author on why they choose this style of writing.  History teachers, how great would it be to show video of the actual debate between Nixon and Kennedy?

But I am getting overly excited again (like I said I am a fan).  My fellow educators have been asking me how to create this videos. I spoke once before about aTubecatcher, but I feel I need to mention a few others so that you don’t have to wait for post after post to learn about them. So here are some of the ones that I highly recommend for flipping your classroom.  Most require you to download the program, but Quicktime for Mac based products should already be available to you and is easy to use. Remember once you create you video or screen shot you need to save/upload it somewhere.  My school created a Wikispace, while other educators choose to use YouTube, SchoolTube, TeacherTube or  the blog of their choice.

Have fun! Now go flip out!

Screen Shot Programs
Screen Recording Programs
Screencast-o-matic   http://www.screencast-o-matic.com/

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Filed under Flipped Classroom, Movie, Presentation, Technology, Video